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Red Wolf Pups

Adorable and vital

to a critically endangered species.

Our litter of eight red wolf pups was born May 10 to parents Charlotte and Hyde. Adorable and growing fast, they are the latest success in the story of recovery for this iconic, endangered American species.

PUPDATE: Our pups are growing fast, and have special fur dye IDs! Click to read the latest.

Meet the pups

Eight new pups
with nature names.
In a public vote, Zoo fans chose nature names for our pups. Chester, Cypress and Hawthorn are the boys, while Camellia, Magnolia, Myrtle, Peat and Willow are the girls. All are named after flowers, plants or trees in the wolves' native range in North Carolina.
Latest pupdate
Exploring outside
Spot them in the woods
The pups are growing! You can come visit anytime, but you'll have to look hard to spot them in the long grass. That's deliberate, to protect them and reassure mom Charlotte. Meet them at the 2pm Keeper Chat daily.
See daily schedule
Saving a species
One pup at a time
The pups aren't just cute - they're vital to saving this iconic American species. Once on the brink of extinction, red wolves were saved by a conservation program led by our Zoo. But they are still at risk. You can help.
Learn more
Extraordinary care
every day.
Our pups, like every Zoo animal, get the best of care every day from keepers and the veterinary team. Newborn exams, regular check-ups and keeping their environment quiet and safe are just some of the things we do to care for our red wolves.
Pups meet the vet

Puppy Timeline

Birth to 3 weeks
Tiny but determined.
Red wolf pups are born blind and dependent on mom for food and safety.
They explore by smell and touch, communicating by grunts and squeaks.
3-5 weeks
Getting mobile.
Growing fast, they explore their habitat, still nursing and wobbly on their feet.
Mom will keep a watchful eye and carry them back in her mouth if they stray.
5-10 weeks
Feisty and playful.
By now, pups have tiny sharp teeth. Adults regurgitate food for them to eat.
They are playful and feisty, wrestling and play-biting adults and each other.
4-8 months
Learning, growing.
By watching adults, pups learn hunting and how to communicate by howls.
They also grow fast:. By 7 months they will look a lot like adults.

Help Save Wolves

Join the story.

THE THREAT: By the 1970s, only 14 pure red wolves existed on the planet, due to ceaseless hunting. By the 1980s, those wolves were brought from the wild to a zoo-based breeding program to restore the population.

TAKE ACTION: We joined with other zoos and agencies to save the red wolf, breeding and reintroducing them in the wild. There are now only 20-25 wolves in the wild, and about 256 at zoos and wildlife centers. They need our help to survive.

Animal Stories

One, two, 200! The 2019 Sea Otter Count

On a fine day this summer, Stephanie Rager, staff biologist at the Zoo’s Rocky Shores habitat, went for a hike. After three miles and a lot of uphill walking at the remote edge of Washington’s Olympic Peninsula, she arrived with two other women at the rocky outcrop of Sand Point. There they set up a … Continued

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Walrus Training

Cindy Roberts and Sheriden Ploof stood in long rubber boots on the edge of the walrus pool, metal bucket in hand. For the two Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium staff biologists, it was a bittersweet moment. Basilla and Kulusiq, the zoo’s two female walruses, were leaving for a new home in sunny San Diego – … Continued

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Feeding Chiquita

It’s possibly the best job in the world. Adrienne Umpstead, staff biologist at the Wild Wonders Outdoor Theater, sits in a pool of sunlight just near the tamandua habitat. One foot propped on a stool, her lap is covered with a small pillow and fleece blanket. One hand is poised with a bottle; the other … Continued

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Wolf Awareness Weekend
Save the date for Wolf Awareness Weekend, an event Oct. 19-20 with wolf enrichments, activities, keeper chats and more.