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Red Wolf Pups

Adorable and vital

to a critically endangered species.

Our litter of eight red wolf pups was born May 10, 2019 to parents Charlotte and Hyde. Adorable and growing fast, they are the latest success in the story of recovery for this iconic, endangered American species.

PUPDATE: Our pups are now as big as their parents! The three males have been moved to our breeding facility – look out for the five females plus Charlotte!

Meet the pups

Eight new pups
with nature names.
In a public vote, Zoo fans chose nature names for our pups. Chester, Cypress and Hawthorn are the boys, while Camellia, Magnolia, Myrtle, Peat and Willow are the girls. All were named after flowers, plants or trees in the wolves' native range in North Carolina.
Saving a species
One pup at a time
The pups aren't just cute - they're vital to saving this iconic American species. Once on the brink of extinction, red wolves were saved by a conservation program led by our Zoo. But they are still at risk. You can help.
Learn more
Extraordinary care
every day.
Our pups, like every Zoo animal, get the best of care every day from keepers and the veterinary team. Newborn exams, regular check-ups and keeping their environment quiet and safe are just some of the things we do to care for our red wolves.
Pups meet the vet

Puppy Timeline

Birth to 3 weeks
Tiny but determined.
Red wolf pups are born blind and dependent on mom for food and safety.
They explore by smell and touch, communicating by grunts and squeaks.
3-5 weeks
Getting mobile.
Growing fast, they explore their habitat, still nursing and wobbly on their feet.
Mom will keep a watchful eye and carry them back in her mouth if they stray.
5-10 weeks
Feisty and playful.
By now, pups have tiny sharp teeth. Adults regurgitate food for them to eat.
They are playful and feisty, wrestling and play-biting adults and each other.
4-8 months
Learning, growing.
By watching adults, pups learn hunting and how to communicate by howls.
They also grow fast:. By 7 months they will look a lot like adults.

Help Save Wolves

Join the story.

THE THREAT: By the 1970s, only 14 pure red wolves existed on the planet, due to ceaseless hunting. By the 1980s, those wolves were brought from the wild to a zoo-based breeding program to restore the population.

TAKE ACTION: We joined with other zoos and agencies to save the red wolf, breeding and reintroducing them in the wild. There are now only 20-25 wolves in the wild, and about 256 at zoos and wildlife centers. They need our help to survive.

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Meet the Cousins
At our sister zoo Northwest Trek you can meet the red wolf's cousin: the gray wolf. Watch the Trek pack in their forested habitat.