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Sumatran tiger

Did you know?

Panthera tigris sumatrae

Tigers are excellent swimmers! They can easily cross rivers and lakes five miles wide. Our own tigers enjoy a swim now and then, especially on a hot day or to find food.

Discover tigers

Habitat
Wild and Zoo
Sumatran tigers live in lowland and mountain forests on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Around 7-8 feet long, they have characteristic black striping on orange fur, with long whiskers and claws.
Meet the Keepers
(They don't bite.)
Keepers in our Asian Forest Sanctuary give a chat each day at 12:30 pm – look for the signs in that area to find them. Ask questions about each animal, and find out how our zoo team feeds and cares for them.
See daily schedule

Meet our tigers

Bandar
Mohan
Kirana
Kali
Eating
(and predators!)
Tigers are carnivores. They hunt wild pigs, deer, tapirs, fish and anything else they can catch.
Humans are the Sumatran tiger’s main predator, hunting them for meat, fur and protection. Young tigers can fall prey to leopards, snakes and other tigers.
Born wild
and ready to hunt.
After a gestation of 100-110 days, females give birth to a litter of 2-4 cubs.
Cubs weigh a little over two pounds at birth, and nurse for 6-10 weeks. By 18 months they are ready to hunt for themselves.
Hunt like a tiger
Sleep like a cat.
Tigers are generally solitary, and not very active most of the time. They sleep 18-20 hours per day!
Males and females both mark their territory by spraying urine on trees, bushes and the ground.

Protecting Tigers

Hunted tiger, shrinking forest

THE THREAT: Like many animals, tigers depend on tropical rainforests to survive in the wild. In southeast Asia, these forests are rapidly being cut down to grow palm oil, found in many food products. Tigers are also hunted by poachers – fewer than 300 survive in Sumatra.

TAKE ACTION: To help save tigers, learn about and buy only products made with sustainable palm oil. Urge companies to make the switch. And consider donating to our Dr. Holly Reed fund, which supports tiger conservation in Sumatra.

Jungle Stories

Cho Cho: Fifty-two and fabulous

For most of us, a wellness exam at 52 is all about middle-age health issues. For Cho Cho, it’s an impressive tribute to a senior siamang and the Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium staff who care for him – because at 52, Cho Cho is believed to be the oldest siamang in human care in … Continued

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Sculpting Sand Species

Q: Where in the world would you find an elephant, a sea turtle and an axolotl all together? A: In Species in the Sand, the new sand sculpture this summer at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium! Beginning mid-May, our sculpting team led by Tacoma native Sue McGrew will return to create another incredible sculpture – … Continued

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A Tapir Ultrasound

Zoological Aide Katie Schachtsick holds a long-handled back-scratcher and applies just the right amount of pressure as she rubs it across the black-and-white hide of endangered Malayan tapir Yuna. It’s clear Yuna enjoys the attention – and the back rub – leaning into the scratcher and then moving her stout legs down, getting into a … Continued

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Who's nearby?
Visiting our tigers? Then keep an eye out for our tapirs! As we rotate our Asian Sanctuary animals around their habitats, this keeps the smells interesting for both species…