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Clouded leopard

Did you know?

Neofelis nebulosa

Can you spot our clouded leopards? It can be tricky – they’re shy, nocturnal and excellently camouflaged!

Here’s a tip: Try looking up. Clouded leopards are fantastic climbers.

Discover Clouded leopards

Habitat
Wild and Zoo
Clouded leopards live in tropical forests, grasslands, scrub and mangrove swamps in Nepal, Sikkim, southern China, Sumatra, Thailand and Borneo. Find them in the Asian Forest Sanctuary.
Asian Forest Sanctuary
Meet the Keepers
(they don't bite.)
Our elephant keepers also look after the clouded leopards. They give a talk each day at 1 pm – bring all your questions! You might also spot one of our clouded leopards in a Wild Wonders animal show.
See daily schedule

Meet our clouded leopards

Orchid
Banyan
Tien
Jao Ying
Nah Fun
Sang Dao
Chee Wit
Chai Li
Eating
(and predators!)
Clouded leopards are carnivores. They hunt monkeys, small deer, wild pigs, birds and rodents; also domestic calves, pigs, goats and poultry.
Their predators are mainly humans, hunting them for their pelts and to protect livestock; and by tigers.
Climbing trees
at six weeks.
In the wild, clouded leopards breed year-round. After a three-month gestation period, females give birth, usually in hollow trees, to litters of 1-5 cubs.
Cubs are born blind. They open their eyes after 10-12 days and by six weeks are climbing trees. They stay with their mothers for about 10 months, learning how to hunt.
Acrobats
and hunters.
Mostly solitary, clouded leopards hunt at night, They stalk their prey from the trees or ground and are rarely seen by people.
They can climb upside down, hang from branches with their hind feet and even climb down trees headfirst like a squirrel!

Protecting Clouded leopards

Vanishing forests.

THE THREAT: Clouded leopards are endangered. Their tropical forests are being cut down at the world’s fastest deforestation rate (around 1.2% yearly) for logging, human habitat and to grow palm oil, a common food product.

TAKE ACTION: Check products you use for sustainable palm oil, and encourage companies to make the switch. Send a letter, email or tweet, and download a Palm Oil Shopping App.

Asian forest Stories

A Tapir Ultrasound

Zoological Aide Katie Schachtsick holds a long-handled back-scratcher and applies just the right amount of pressure as she rubs it across the black-and-white hide of endangered Malayan tapir Yuna. It’s clear Yuna enjoys the attention – and the back rub – leaning into the scratcher and then moving her stout legs down, getting into a … Continued

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AI for endangered tigers

Cross your paws. And think of tiger cubs! Our endangered female Sumatran tigers, 5-year-old Kali and 4-year-old Kirana, could be pregnant. Both were artificially inseminated Jan. 30 with sperm from 14-year-old Mohan. We won’t know for a few weeks if a pregnancy resulted, but if successful, tiger cubs would be born in May. But it … Continued

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5 Animals that Beat the Cold

We’re all feeling the cold right about now in the Pacific Northwest – and the rest of the country too. But here at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, our animals have some pretty cool ways to deal with it. From fur coats to heated hammocks, here are five ways our animals beat the winter cold. … Continued

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Who's Nearby?
Visiting our clouded leopards? Then you’re super-close to our Asian elephants! Meet these amazing giants and chat with their keepers at daily presentations.