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Camel Rides

Climb on up

We’re the only zoo in the Northwest where you can climb on a camel! Feel on top of the world in the comfy saddle of our dromedary camels, and pose for the perfect photo op at the same time. (It’s a summer and Zoolights favorite.)

Discover the Camels

Open seasonally
(They like it warm.)
Camel rides are now closed for the season. Come back during Zoolights: Rides cost $8 per person ($6 Zoo members), with $7 commemorative photo extra. Age 3+.
See schedule
Find them
in the zoo
Domestic camels are found in the Middle East, and some live wild in dry areas of Australia, though they're not native. To find ours, go downhill from the central plaza and head right.
Plan your day

"Whooo's" Nearby?

Argentine tegu
Green iguana
Barn owl
Nibble and slurp
It's all about quantity.
How much can you drink? A dromedary camel can drink 100 liters (26 gallons) of water in just ten minutes!
Camels eat what they find in the desert: thorny plants, dry grasses. But they don’t eat entire shrubs – just a few bites from each plant.
Baby camels
Get up and walk.
Dromedary camels breed in the rainy season. Females give birth to a single calf after a 12-15-month pregnancy.
Calves can walk by the end of their first day and start eating grass at 2-3 months old, though they nurse for 1-2 years.
Those eyelashes
(Nostrils too)
Camels are adapted for life in the desert. Heavy eyebrows, a double row of eyelashes, closeable nostril slits and even a clear eyelid all work to protect them against sandstorms.
Their humps are made of fat and store nutrients (not water). They can lose over 30 percent of their body weight in water without suffering, where most mammals would die.

Animal Stories

We opened the Pacific Seas Aquarium!

Two dozen necks crane up, up, up, eyes riveted on the scene above, as four hammerhead sharks cruise overhead. Sunny the sea turtle joins the scene, swimming unhurriedly by and then diving deeper into his home. Suddenly, two eagle rays “fly” overhead, their pectoral fins gently flapping up and down to propel them through the … Continued

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Farewell, Dozer!

Dozer, the lovable, 3,078-pound walrus with the 17-inch-long tusks and unmistakable whistle, is leaving Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium mid-September. But there’s still time to bid him farewell. He’ll be featured on the marine mammal Keeper Talks at 3pm Saturday Sept. 15 and Sunday Sept. 16, the last weekend before he leaves. Dozer’s a crowd … Continued

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Terra the tamandua, climbing high

With soft pale fur and sharp claws, Terra moseys up a log. She goes farther, her long tail wrapping for balance, sniffing and exploring until she’s way overhead. Then, without fuss, she makes her way back almost upside-down. Meet Terra, the Zoo’s new Southern tamandua. “She loves to climb,” says Jessie Sutherland, staff biologist at … Continued

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Camels in Asia?
You bet! The Bactrian camel lives in Central Asia, but unlike the dromedary, it has two humps.